August 2015

Event Date: 
Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 18:00 - 18:15
Institution: 
Institut de Ciencies del Mar
Title: 

Seasonal diversity patterns of marine picoeukaryotes from a Mediterranean coastal site

Abstract: 

Picoeukaryotes are the most abundant eukaryotes in the sea and are  
recognized as fundamental components of marine ecosystems,  
contributing to phytoplankton biomass, primary production and food web  
interactions. The study of their diversity requires molecular surveys,  
which have been lately expanding with the emergence of High Throughput  
Sequencing (HTS). Hitherto, many studies have focused in describing  
the diversity present in different sites but not along time. In this  
work we performed a time series study in order to find out the  
seasonal patterns in the diversity of picoeukaryotes. We analyzed a  
sample dataset taken monthly during 4 years in a Northwestern  
Mediterranean coastal site and processed by HTS of the 18S rDNA. Our  
results showed that only 1% of the OTUs were present in all samples. A  
few taxonomic groups were the most abundant in the community yearlong,  
while different groups were the most diverse. Interestingly, we found  
that the OTUs presenting the highest number of reads generally did not  
show a seasonal pattern, whereas some less abundant OTUs might exhibit  
a very marked temporal distribution.

Event Date: 
Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 18:15 - 18:30
Institution: 
CSIRO
Title: 

Effects of temporal pH shifts on ammonia oxidiser community structure and function

Abstract: 

Soil nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia to nitrate, is and driven by bacterial and archaeal autotrophic ammonia oxidisers (AOB and AOA) that carry out the first, rate limiting, step of oxidising ammonia to nitrite.  Previous work has suggested that adaptation and selection in AOA and AOB communities is, to some extent, pH driven.  Acidophilic, acido-neutral, and alkalinophilic groups have been identified by environmental surveys of amoA genes.  These studies of the role of pH in determining ammonia oxidiser community structure and activity have largely relied on spatial pH gradients.  In many managed soil systems (e.g., agricultural systems) edaphic factors (e.g., pH, N concentrations) vary widely temporally and the implications of short term temporal shifts in factors thought to govern oxidiser community structure, and therefore our ability to manipulate edaphic factors to direct community structure, are not well understood.   We investigated the roles of pH in driving nitrifier activity (potential) and community structure over a crop growing season (6 sampling points) in agricultural soils by comparing unamended soils with soils amended with lime to create a temporal pH gradient.  Liming induced a rapid and sustained change in the pH of surface soils (0-10cm), with pH in these soils increasing from 4.8 to 6.5, while in subsurface soils pH increased to a lesser degree after liming (4.3 – 4.5).  After liming, potential nitrification rates increased significantly throughout the production season in both surface and subsurface soils.   TRFLP analysis of total bacterial and archaeal communities showed significant partitioning of the broader communities with soil depth, pH treatment and time, suggesting that microbial communities respond rapidly to changes and that temporal variation in community structure is an important, if often overlooked, factor in assessing microbial diversity patterns. These changes were greater for bacterial, than archaeal, communities. We then utilised amoA gene microarrays to investigate specific AOA and AOB community responses to temporally induced pH changes.  Despite significant changes to ammonia oxidiser function, we saw only very weak changes in community structure of AOA and AOB, suggesting that over shorter temporal periods soil communities are resilient to environmental change and that niche partitioning of ammonia oxidiser communities is likely to be spatially, rather than temporally, governed.

Event Date: 
Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 19:00 - 19:45
Institution: 
CSIRO
Title: 

The evolution of mutualistic trait variation in rhizobial symbionts across genetic and geographic scales

Abstract: 

Interactions between plants and nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria are characterized by high genetic diversity for traits important to the outcome of the interaction at the population and species level. However, the selective processes underpinning the generation and maintenance of genetic and phenotypic variation in such interactions are not well understood. I will present an overview of data gathered from a series of experiments using interactions between Acacia spp. and their associated rhizobia, and that address questions regarding the ecological and evolutionary drivers of trait variation across different scales.  Specifically, I will discuss how 1) phylogenetic constraint; 2) within-species local adaptation; 3) nutrient availability; and 4) partner diversity and identity, influence patterns of specialization and community structure in legume-rhizobial mutualistic interactions. Our results suggest that both host-bacterial and bacterial-bacterial interactions are important for understanding evolutionary and ecological dynamics and highlight the importance of designing experiments that span different genetic and geographic scales.