July 2017

Event Date: 
Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 18:00 - 18:15
Institution: 
Macquarie University
Title: 

Fibre products derived from sugarcane, wheat dextrin and psyllium husk have different effects on the gut microbiota

Abstract: 

Diets low in complex polysaccharides have been shown to perturb the gut microbiota-host relationship, and thus impact host health. As evidence supporting this hypothesis continues to grow, therapeutic modulation of the gut microbiota through supplementation of complex polysaccharides for preventing or treating diseases has gained significant scientific and commercial interest. A number of supplements in the form of dietary fibre or prebiotics are marketed commercially for this purpose. However, only limited work has been conducted to scientifically evaluate the ability of these products to alter the gut microbiota and improve host health.  In this work, we investigated the impact of three commercially available dietary fibre products on the gut microbiota and metabolite production. We used an in vitro adult digestive and gut microbiota model system and high fat diet fed mice to examine the effect of dietary fibre supplementation on the gut microbiota, metabolites and host physiology.
Our results demonstrated significant shifts in the overall gut microbiota community structure upon addition of each product. The abundance of various bacterial taxa associated with fibre digestion and anti-inflammatory capabilities increased with fibre additions. However, the specific nature of the alterations was product-dependent. Fibre supplementation in mice ameliorated high fat diet-induced changes in the abundance of specific gut bacteria and host liver proteome, whilst no significant changes in the glucose clearance or body weight were observed. 

Event Date: 
Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 18:15 - 18:30
Institution: 
i3 institute - University of Technology Sydney
Title: 

Why is my metagenomic assembly such rubbish? And how can I fix it?

Event Date: 
Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 19:00 - 19:45
Institution: 
i3 institute - University of Technology Sydney
Title: 

Multiple antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli from humans and food animals – A One Health Approach

Abstract: 

Nearly one third of the projected 10 million deaths p.a. caused by antimicrobial-resistant infections in 2050, are predicted to be caused by multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli). E. coli pathogens are broadly defined as intestinal pathogenic E. coli (IPEC) and extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) and outbreaks of severe disease have been caused by both. The rise of multiple antimicrobial resistance (MAR) in ExPEC is expected to pose a serious threat to human and food animal health. ExPEC represent the most frequent Gram negative pathogen in humans and cause a range of diseases including infections of the urinary tract (cystitis, prostatitis, pyelonephritis), wounds, sepsis and meningitis. ExPEC infections incur an enormous cost to health care budgets and are suspected of having a foodborne aetiology, but there are major gaps in knowledge. Only a fraction of the antibiotics that are consumed by humans and food animals are metabolised, with the remainder passing from the body and accumulating in sewage and animal waste ponds. The removal of antibiotics from human and animal waste is both challenging and costly, and the application of animal feces as fertiliser represents an underappreciated path to reintroduce these drugs into soil and aquatic environments. Clearly, there is an urgent need to better understand human, food animal and environmental resistomes. Over 500 E. coli that carry the class 1 integron integrase gene intI1, a reliable proxy for a multiple drug resistance genotype were sequenced. Our collection includes uropathogenic E.coli from humans and a combination of commensal and pathogenic E. coli from intensively reared food animals. We examined the phylogenetic relationships these E. coli share and examined the repertoire of mobile genetic elements that play an important role in mobilizing antimicrobial resistance genes. The datasets underpin a One Health approach to tackling the problem of antimicrobial resistance.
 
 

We are recruiting two postdoctoral fellows for our new project on Environomics of coastal environments  at CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere in Hobart, Tasmania.

 

We are seeking candidates with experience in:

 

1) Microbial Ecology of Coastal Environments:

 

* Producing and analysing metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data

Two months into the official winter end of the Australian (NSW) calendar and we've come to another installment of our seminar series. Please come tomorrow night (Tuesday) and hear from a great set of speakers.

Speakers for this month

  • 6:00pm - Hasinika Gamage - Macquarie University -  Fibre products derived from sugarcane, wheat dextrin and psyllium husk have different effects on the gut microbiota.
  • 6:15pm - A/Prof. Aaron Darling - i3 UTS - Why is my metagenomic assembly such rubbish? And how can I fix it?
  • 7:00pm - Prof. Steven P. Djordjevic - i3 UTS - Multiple antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli from humans and food animals – A One Health Approach.