A keen crowd of about 35 braved the rain to attend the September JAMS, which this month was held within the more spacious setting of the 4th floor at the Australian Museum. This month’s presentations all had a marine flavour, with the audience enjoying three entertaining talks focussed on the community dynamics and biogeochemical capabilities of marine microorganisms.

A dinner at the Australian Museum
83%
A weekend retreat in some beautiful location
17%
Nothing, just a regular meeting
0%
Nothing, I hate birthdays anyway
0%
Total votes: 12

It's true, the first "pilot" meeting of JAMS was almost a year ago on november 24th 2010.Not long before (to me it feels like yesterday), Andy, Ian, Mike and myself met at the Trinity bar and started tossing around ideas on getting it all started. We still had no clue of when, where, or how we were going to do it. We just knew it had to be done and we'd all benefit from it.We have come a long way from there. We've had 29 speakers, some from overseas, many from out of town giving great seminars. We've had talks ranging from viruses to mosquitoes, from tropical oceans to alpine soils. But above all, we've had lots of fun!So to celebrate JAMS's first year of success I think we should have some sort of a birthday celebration.

Yes
83%
No
17%
I don't like pizza anyway
0%
Total votes: 6

An enthusiastic crowd of around 50 gathered to see out the winter months on the last day of August at another great JAMS meeting at the Australian Museum. The JAMS series brings together research microbiologists, including post-docs, PhD students and senior researchers, working in non-clinical projects from institutes throughout the Sydney region. The JAMS organisers would like to thank the Australian Museum for providing the fantastic venue for the meetings, as well as the Australian Society for Microbiology for sponsoring the event to provide pizza and drinks.

JAMS celebrated July at the Australian Museum with a diverse series of talks and food and drinks, kindly supported by ASM.

Rita Rapa (UTS) started us off describing the integron/gene cassette system in the Vibrio genus. These gene cassettes add to the adaptive potential of Vibrio and are likely to be an important driver in the evolution of Vibrio in their respective niches. Through whole cell proteomic analysis, deletions in the gene cassette array exhibit altered surface associated structures. Her future work will focus on how these deletions impact Vibrio physiology.

How many microbiologists does it take to change a light bulb? None, as it turns out - the dozens of attendees at June's Joint Academic Microbiology Seminars (JAMS) at the Australian Museum waited patiently through a short blackout for drinks, snacks, and three servings of fresh scientific discussion.

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