Event Date: 
Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - 14:30 - 21:00

You are invited to our inaugural anniversary half-day meeting at the Australian Museum, set for February 29th. Please sign-up to this event if you wish to attend or email us if need be.

Registration costs have been reduced to $35 for students and $75 for everyone else, thanks to the generous sponsorships of POCD Scientific, BD, The School of Molecular Bioscience (U. Sydney), The School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences (UNSW), The School of Medicine (UWS), The Biomolecular Frontiers Research Centre (Macquarie U.), The Environmental Microbiology Initiative (UNSW), The C3 and I3 Institutes (UTS).

There is an expanded schedule with some great speakers from out of town and a poster session for PhD students. As an incentive for students to present their work, the best poster will be awarded with the inaugural EMI Best Poster Award.

If you intend to present your work, please provide a poster title during registration.

The schedule of the meeting is as follows:

2.30 - 3.00pm Poster setup.
3.00 - 3.15pm Welcomes, introductions and acknowledgements.

Dear JAMSters,

With the Holiday season well underway I wanted to wish you all lasting health and happiness for the coming new year and thank you for making JAMS such a success this year.

Next year promises to be even better and will start off with a great lineup for our January 25th meeting:

Metagenomics has been a hot topic at JAMS in 2011. Playing to this popular theme, Thomas Jeffries of the University of Technology, Sydney opened the final meeting for the year with his metagenomic analysis of taxonomic and functional patterns in South Australia's hypersaline Coorong Lagoon. Thomas and colleagues found shifts in the abundance of cyanobacteria and Archaea linked to a salinity and nutrient gradient along the lagoon, as well as a shift in the abundance of genes related to salinity tolerance and photosynthesis. Surprisingly, despite the extreme range of environmental factors within Coorong, they found these patterns were dwarfed when the lagoon samples were placed in a global context, which showed substrate - in this case, solid or fluid - had a greater influence on taxonomic profiles. Thomas's work shows the importance of scale in the relationship between a microbial community and its environment.

Many scientific minds gathered together for a series of talks on a warm October evening at the Australian Museum.

The first presenter, Martin Ostrowski from Macquarie University continued from last month’s marine microbiology theme by presenting the genetics and ecology of Synechococcus. He demonstrated the distribution patterns of Synechococcus lineages are similar in different ocean systems with comparable environmental conditions. However, specific Synechococcus lineages show a distinct distribution pattern at a global scale. This finding may be useful to predict bacterial community structures in marine ecosystems.

A keen crowd of about 35 braved the rain to attend the September JAMS, which this month was held within the more spacious setting of the 4th floor at the Australian Museum. This month’s presentations all had a marine flavour, with the audience enjoying three entertaining talks focussed on the community dynamics and biogeochemical capabilities of marine microorganisms.

A dinner at the Australian Museum
83%
A weekend retreat in some beautiful location
17%
Nothing, just a regular meeting
0%
Nothing, I hate birthdays anyway
0%
Total votes: 12

It's true, the first "pilot" meeting of JAMS was almost a year ago on november 24th 2010.Not long before (to me it feels like yesterday), Andy, Ian, Mike and myself met at the Trinity bar and started tossing around ideas on getting it all started. We still had no clue of when, where, or how we were going to do it. We just knew it had to be done and we'd all benefit from it.We have come a long way from there. We've had 29 speakers, some from overseas, many from out of town giving great seminars. We've had talks ranging from viruses to mosquitoes, from tropical oceans to alpine soils. But above all, we've had lots of fun!So to celebrate JAMS's first year of success I think we should have some sort of a birthday celebration.

Yes
83%
No
17%
I don't like pizza anyway
0%
Total votes: 6
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