Microfluidics

Event Date: 
Wednesday, November 27, 2013 - 19:00 - 20:00
Institution: 
Deptartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, MIT
Title: 

The Ocean....from the microscale

Abstract: 

At a time when microbial ecology is largely traveling along genomic roads, we cannot forget that the functions and services of microbes depend greatly on their behaviors, encounters, and interactions with their environment. New technologies, including microfluidics, high-speed video-microscopy and image analysis, provide a powerful opportunity to spy on the lives of microbes, directly observing their behaviors at the spatiotemporal resolution most relevant to their ecology. I will illustrate this 'natural history approach to microbial ecology' by focusing on marine bacteria, unveiling striking adaptations in their motility and chemotaxis and describing how these are connected to their incredibly dynamic, gradient-rich microenvironments. Specifically, I will present (i) direct evidence for a diverse gallery of microscale microbial hotspots in the ocean; (ii) a new framework for understanding the evolution of microbial diversity in the ocean; and (iii) microfluidic experiments to capture the dramatic chemotactic abilities of bacterial pathogens towards the roiling surface of coral hosts. Through these examples, I hope to show that direct visualization can foster a new layer of understanding in microbial ecology and can help us unlock the ocean's microscale.

JAMS REPORT
Tom Jeffries
 
January JAMS got the new year off to a good start with a solid turnout and some stimulating talks. First up was Olivier Laczka who took us in to the technical realm of biosensors. Olivier’s work has focused on developing cost-effective tools for the rapid identification of micro-organisms relevant to industry and has led to several Patents.

Event Date: 
Wednesday, January 30, 2013 - 18:00 - 18:15
Institution: 
University Technology Sydney
Title: 

Development of an electrochemical biosensor for bacteria detection coupling immuno-capture with magnetic particles and amperometry at flow-channel microband electrodes.

Abstract: 

 
Current technology is insufficient for rapid on-site identification of the causative agents for waterborne diseases and existing time-consuming detection results in delayed management decisions. Fast, reliable and low-cost methods for the screening of pathogens are paramount in fields such as the environment, food industry, healthcare and defense. With the constant progress of scientific knowledge, a fast diversification of detection techniques is occurring, brought about by the appearance of imaginative new concepts within the scientific community. Biosensors are a perfect example of the combination of multidisciplinary knowledge. They encompass many fundamental, technological and scientific advances in biology, chemistry and physics.
Here, we describe a recently developed electrochemical biosensor for the detection of bacteria cells in aqueous samples. The technology used for this detection combines immuno-magnetic capture and amperometric detection in a one-step sandwich format, and in a microfluidic environment. The whole assay could be completed in 1 h and the experiments performed with Escherichia coli evidenced a linear response for concentrations ranging 102–108 cell ml−1.

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