Food and drink

Event Date: 
Wednesday, September 24, 2014 - 19:00 - 19:15
Institution: 
CSIRO
Title: 

Animating the Gut Microbiome

Abstract: 

Animation can be a powerful way to inspire and educate people with science. Creating biomedical animations which depict advanced scientific concepts in a clear way requires 2 main considerations, 1) rigorous investigation of the underlying science, and 2) careful development of the story to express the ideas in a meaningful way.

In this talk Christopher Hammang will present his first biomedical animation “The Hungry Microbiome”. He will explore the challenges involved in animating the human gut microbiome and the unique insight gained from creating an animation about resistant starch. The talk will also explore the workflow and technology which can be used to create these biomedical animations, as well as a brief review of the science underlying resistant starch research.

 

Event Date: 
Wednesday, August 27, 2014 - 18:15 - 18:30
Institution: 
UNSW
Title: 

Analysis of gene co-expression networks reveals mechanisms underlying synergistic antifungal treatment in S. cerevisiae

Abstract: 

 
Background: Fungal pathogens are difficult to treat. There are few effective antifungal drugs available, and resistance is emerging. Iron chelators are promising synergents due to the importance of iron availability during host infection, but the mechanistic role of antifungal-chelator combinations is poorly understood. The project analyses cellular pathways that are differentially expressed during the synergistic response to elucidate the mechanisms and targets of drug-chelator treatment.
Method: To measure the effect of synergistic treatment on the S. cerevisiae transcriptome, cells were treated with i) amphotericin B only; ii) a combination of amphotericin B + lactoferrin, an iron chelator; and iii & iv) corresponding matching controls. RNA-seq data were generated using Illumina HiSeq 2000 with biological triplicates multiplexed and randomized across two sequencing lanes. Differential expression analyses were performed using EdgeR, and the results were co-visualized with biological networks using Cytoscape.
Results: Amphotericin B alone resulted in the down-regulation of nine genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis and the up-regulation of AFT1, a transcription factor involved in iron transport. Amphotericin B + lactoferrin co-treatment halted AFT1 up-regulation and down-regulated genes involved in iron transport. These genes were co-expressed with YAP5, a second transcription factor that co-ordinates the expression of genes that control the nuclear localization of AFT1 and also governs the expression of oxidative stress response genes.

Event Date: 
Wednesday, March 27, 2013 - 19:15 - 20:00
Institution: 
Alfred Wegener Instute for Polar and Marine Research
Title: 

Alexandrium: Evolutionary and ecological insights into the most prominent toxigenic dinoflagellate

Abstract: 

Dinoflagellates are a major cause of harmful algal blooms, with consequences for coastal marine ecosystem functioning and services.  Representatives of Alexandrium tamarense species complex are of the most abundant and widespread toxigenic species, and produces paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins as well as allelochemical substances.  This species complex consists of four to five species. The debate of the separation of this complex into real species in long on going and here a concept for the divorce of this group will be proposed.  Problems with identification of a toxic member of this species complex in November 2012, which led to the accidental export of toxic mussels to Japan, has now led to severe restrictions on Australian shellfish exports to Japan for a year, and resulting losses of many million $. Furthermore, population genetic insight and adaptive strategies in species interaction processes will be presented. Allelochemical mediated intra-population facilitation, may explain at least partly the high genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Alexandrium populations. Consequently, multiple traits within a population potentially allow mutual facilitation, and may promote the success of microbial planktonic populations.

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