Trichodesmium

Event Date: 
Wednesday, October 28, 2015 - 18:15 - 18:30
Institution: 
UTS
Title: 

Heterogeneity in diazotroph diversity and activity within a putative hotspot for marine nitrogen fixation

Abstract: 

Australia’s tropical waters represent predicted “hotspots” for nitrogen (N2) fixation based on empirical and modelled data. However, the identity, activity and ecology of N2 fixing bacteria (diazotrophs) within this region are virtually unknown. By coupling DNA and cDNA sequencing of nitrogenase genes (nifH) with size fractionated N2 fixation rate measurements, we elucidated diazotroph dynamics across the shelf region of the Arafura and Timor Seas (ATS) and oceanic Coral Sea during Austral spring and winter. During spring, Trichodesmium dominated ATS assemblages, comprising 60% of nifH DNA sequences, while Candidatus Atelocyanobacterium thalassa (UCYN-A) comprised 42% in the Coral Sea. In contrast, during winter the relative abundance of heterotrophic unicellular diazotrophs (∂-proteobacteria and gamma-24774A11) increased in both regions, concomitant with a marked decline in UCYN-A sequences, whereby this clade effectively disappeared in the Coral Sea. Conservative estimates of N2 fixation rates ranged from < 1 to 91 nmol L-1 d-1, and size fractionation indicated that unicellular organisms dominated N2 fixation during both spring and winter, but average unicellular rates were up to 10-fold higher in winter than spring. Relative abundances of UCYN-A1 and gamma-24774A11 nifH transcripts negatively correlated to silicate and phosphate, suggesting an affinity for oligotrophy. Our results indicate that Australia’s tropical waters are indeed hotspots for N2 fixation, and that regional physicochemical characteristics drive differential contributions of cyanobacterial and heterotrophic phylotypes to N2 fixation.

Event Date: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2015 - 19:00 - 19:45
Institution: 
University of Southern California
Title: 

Microbial evolutionary surprises in the future ocean:  Long-term adaptation of marine nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria to high CO2

Abstract: 

The globally-distributed marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium plays a key role in ocean biogeochemical cycles, as it is a major source of newly fixed atmospheric nitrogen to marine food webs.  Trichodesmium N2 fixation rates have been shown to increase under expected future high carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in short-term studies due to physiological plasticity, but its long-term adaptive responses to ongoing anthropogenic CO2 increases are unknown. My lab has been carrying out a nearly decade-long experimental evolution study with Trichodesmium growing under selection by projected future elevated CO2 levels.  Unexpectedly, selection under high CO2 results in large increases in nitrogen fixation and growth rates that appear to be irreversible, even after adapted cell lines are moved back to lower present day CO2 levels for hundreds of generations. This represents an unprecedented microbial evolutionary response, as reproductive fitness increases acquired in the selection environment are maintained even after returning to the ancestral environment. These constitutive rate increases are accompanied by irreversible shifts in diel nitrogen fixation patterns, up-regulation of cellular energetic pathways, elevated expression of non-coding intergenic DNA, and increased activity of a potentially regulatory DNA methyltransferase enzyme. Ongoing work in my lab is examining the consequences of multiple nutrient limitation interactions (iron and phosphorus) for the physiology, biochemistry and genetics of Trichodesmium adapted to growing in a more nutrient-limited, acidified future ocean environment.  
 

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