Antarctic

Event Date: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2013 - 18:15 - 18:30
Institution: 
Macquarie University
Title: 

Dissemination of antibiotic resistance determinants via sewage discharge from Davis Station, Antarctica

Abstract: 

Discharge of untreated or macerated sewage presents a significant risk to Antarctic marine ecosystems by introducing non-native microorganisms that potentially impact microbial communities and threaten health of Antarctic wildlife. Despite these risks, disposal of essentially untreated sewage continues in the Antarctic and sub-Antarctic. As part of an environmental impact assessment of the Davis Station, we investigated carriage of antibiotic resistance determinants in Escherichia coli isolates from marine water and sediments, marine invertebrates (Laturnula and Abatus), birds and mammals within 10 km of the Davis sewage outfall. Class 1 integrons typical of human pathogens and commensals were detected in 12% of E. coli isolates. E. coli carrying these integrons were primarily isolated from the near shore marine water column and the filter feeding mollusc Laturnula. Class 1 integrons were not detected in E. coli isolated from seal (Miroungaleonina, Leptonychotes weddellii) or penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) feces. However, isolation of E. coli from these vertebrates’ faeces was also low. Consequently, sewage disposal is introducing non-native microorganisms and associated resistance genes into the Antarctic environment. The impact of this “gene pollution” on the diversity and evolution of native Antarctic microbial communities is unknown. 

 

Event Date: 
Wednesday, January 25, 2012 - 18:15 - 18:30
Institution: 
UNSW
Title: 

The impact of petroleum hydrocarbons on microbial diversity in a sub-Antarctic soil; a proxy for soil health

Abstract: 

Anthropogenic sources of contamination remain a legacy throughout the Antarctic Region, with the majority of contamination occurring alongside concentrated human activities at research stations. At Macquarie Island, an Australian Sub-Antarctic territory we have been investigating the impact of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in the form of Special Antarctic Blend (SAB) diesel fuel on the microbial ecology of sub-Antarctic soils. Whilst bioremediation strategies are currently underway on the Island, there is a lack of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination guidelines specific to Antarctic or sub-Antarctic regions. Additionally, there is insufficient site-specific toxicity data available for remediation end points to be established. Therefore, we have assessed the bacterial and fungal response to increasing concentrations of SAB diesel fuel through a combination of novel culturing methods, flow cytometric analysis of cell numbers and massively paralley pyrosequencing targeting the 16S and ITS genes. Results of this investigation will provide the scientific basis for understanding how much fuel is too much and how clean is clean enough?

Event Date: 
Tuesday, January 25, 2011 - 18:15 - 18:30
Institution: 
UNSW
Title: 

Species, diet and captivity influence the gut microbial community of Antarctic phocid seals.

Event Date: 
Wednesday, November 24, 2010 - 18:00 - 18:15
Institution: 
UNSW
Title: 

Integrative microbiology of a stratified Antarctic lake.

Syndicate content