Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Event Date: 
Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 18:00 - 18:15
Institution: 
University of New South Wales (UNSW)
Title: 

Bacterial secondary metabolite prodigiosin inhibit biofilm development by cleaving extracellular DNA

Abstract: 

Prodigiosin a bacterial secondary metabolite is a heterocyclic compound belongs to the class of tripyrrole, synthesized by various strains of bacteria includes Serratia species. Research on prodigiosin is under limelight for past 10 years from clinical and pharmacological aspects in relevance to its potential to be drug for cancer therapy by inducing apoptosis in several cancer cell lines. Reports suggest that prodigiosin promotes oxidative damage to DNA in presence of copper ion and consequently lead to inhibition of cell-cycle progression and inducing cell death. However, prodigiosin has not been previously implicated in biofilm inhibition. We performed experiments to reveal any link between prodigiosin and biofilm inhibition through degradation of extracellular DNA which plays a major role in biofilm establishment. Our study showed that prodigiosin (extracted from Serratia culture) has strong DNA cleaving property but does not intercalate with nitrogenous bases of DNA. Using P. aeruginosa PA14 wild-type strain as a model organism we showed that bacterial cells treated with prodigiosin showed significant reduction in its cells surface hydrophobicity and consequently affecting surface energies and physico-chemical property essential for bacterial adhesion and aggregation. We also found that prodigiosin did not influence planktonic growth of P. aeruginosa however, was successful in inhibiting the establishment of biofilms includes decrease in biofilm thickness, adhesion to substratum, decrease in biovolume, microcolony formation and also significantly dispersed pre-established biofilm of P. aeruginosa. This novel function on the biofilm inhibition of prodigiosin could be used to interfere with risks associated with bacterial biofilms. 

Event Date: 
Wednesday, October 29, 2014 - 18:15 - 18:30
Institution: 
UTS
Title: 

Stigmergic social behaviours facilitate the active expansion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa interstitial biofilms.

Abstract: 

Erin S. Gloag1, Awais Javed2, Huabin Wang3, Michelle L. Gee3, Scott A. Wade2, Lynne Turnbull1, Cynthia B. Whitchurch1*
1 The ithree institute, University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, NSW, 2007, Australia.
2 Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC, 3122, Australia
3 School of Chemistry, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia.
 
Biofilms are often found associated with infections of implantable medical devices; accounting for approximately half of all nosocomial infections. Biofilms are often thought of as sessile surface-attached communities that are embedded in a protective slimy matrix. However, many bacterial pathogens also have the capacity to actively expand their biofilm communities via complex multi-cellular behaviours. We have observed that when P. aeruginosa is cultured at the interstitial surface between a coverslip and solidified nutrient media the resulting biofilm actively expands via twitching motility and is characterised by the formation of an extensive pattern of interconnected trails.
We set out to identify the factors governing pattern formation and coordinated movement during P. aeruginosa interstitial biofilm expansion. Our observations have revealed that during biofilm migration the cells at the advancing edge create furrows as they migrate across the semi-solid media The following cells are preferentially confined to these furrows, resulting in the emergence of an interconnected furrow network and the subsequent extensive large scale-patterning characteristic of these biofilms.
Stigmergy is a concept which describes self-organisation processes observed in higher organisms and abiotic systems through indirect communication via persistent cues in the environment left by individuals that influence the behavior of other individuals of the group at a later point in time. Our observations indicate that self-organised pattern formation in P. aeruginosa interstitial biofilms is also a stigmergic phenomenon. To our knowledge this is the first time that stigmergy has been identified as a mechanism of self-organisation of bacterial biofilms and propose that the concept of stigmergy can be included in the repertoire of systems used by bacteria to co-ordinate complex multicellular behaviours. We are currently exploring the development of novel antimicrobial strategies aimed at controlling and inhibiting biofilm expansion in medical settings via exploiting our new understanding of biofilm expansion.

Event Date: 
Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - 19:00 - 19:45
Institution: 
UTS
Title: 

The production of public goods in bacterial biofilms

Abstract: 

“Public goods” in bacterial communities are extracellular products that are released by a sub-set of individuals that provide benefits to the local population.  Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a public good that has been found to be required for the formation of sessile biofilms by many species of bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa.  We have recently shown that eDNA also facilitates the active expansion of P. aeruginosa biofilms by engineering the formation of a network of interconnected furrows and directing traffic flow throughout the furrow network to efficiently supply cells to the leading edge of the expanding biofilm. The mechanism by which eDNA is produced by P. aeruginosa and many other bacterial species is poorly understood. We have discovered a novel mechanism that accounts for the production of eDNA as well as other “public goods” in P. aeruginosa biofilms. 

Event Date: 
Wednesday, April 30, 2014 - 18:00 - 18:15
Institution: 
School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences UNSW
Title: 

The roles of extracellular DNA in bacterial biofilm formation

Abstract: 

Bacterial biofilm formation is dependent upon production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) mainly composed of polysaccharides, proteins, lipids and extracellular DNA (eDNA). eDNA promotes initial bacterial adhesion, aggregation, biofilm formation in a wide range of bacterial species. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa eDNA is a major component of biofilms and is essential for biofilm formation and stability. P. aeruginosa also produces phenazine an electrochemically active metabolite and phenazine production promotes eDNA release. The relationship between eDNA release and phenazine production is bridged via hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation and subsequent H2O2 mediated cell lysis and ultimately release of chromosomal DNA into the extracellular environment as eDNA. Recent investigation showed pyocyanin (a kind of phenazine predominantly produced by P. aeruginosa) binds to eDNA mediated through intercalation of pyocyanin with eDNA. Pyocyanin binding to DNA has significant impacts on DNA properties and also on P. aeruginosa cell surface properties including its hydrophobicity, attractive surface energies physico-chemical interactions and bacterial aggregation.

Event Date: 
Wednesday, February 23, 2011 - 18:00 - 18:15
Institution: 
UTS
Title: 

Class 1 integrons in genomic islands of pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates.

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