Virology

Event Date: 
Wednesday, March 25, 2015 - 19:00 - 19:45
Institution: 
University of Sydney
Title: 

Poxviruses: Man’s Best Friend. (Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Virus)

Abstract: 

 

Poxviruses and humans have had a chequered past. Once the scourge known as smallpox routinely devastated human populations, some estimates are as high as 200 million mortalities last century. However the discovery of a tame version of the virus led to Edward Jenner to demonstrate the practise we now know as vaccination, which has gone some way to repairing the reputation of this virus. My research is built on the premise the these viruses still have much to teach us about many aspects of virology and host cell biology. And one of the most novel and exciting applications may be just around the corner.

 

Event Date: 
Wednesday, March 6, 2013 (All day) - Thursday, March 7, 2013 (All day)

The Molecular Microbiology Meeting for 2013 has been booked for March 6th and 7th at Waterview in Bicentenial Park, Sydney, NSW. Please put the date in your diaries.

Note that the venue has changed and we are planning a meeting over 2 days. For those travelling interstate there is accommodation nearby at the Novotel and Ibis Hotels. You can book accommodation on the registration page.

Holding the meeting over 2 days has allowed us to invite more speakers and make more space for oral presentations selected from abstracts so please plan your abstract and register for the meeting so that we can include you in the program. Closing date for oral presentations will be October 26th.

The program will include:
Professor David Livermore - Drug resistance (Keynote) University of East Anglia (UEA) and Health Protection Agency, London UK

A/Professor Leo Poon - Emerging viruses (Keynote) University of Hong Kong

Professor Tom Riley -    C.difficile (Keynote) University of Western Australia

Event Date: 
Wednesday, August 31, 2011 - 18:00 - 18:15
Institution: 
CSIRO
Title: 

Cheating, trade-offs and the evolution of virulence in a natural pathogen population

Abstract: 

The evolutionary dynamics of pathogens are critically important for disease outcomes, prevalence and emergence. In this talk I will discuss some specific ecological conditions that promote the long-term maintenance of virulence polymorphisms in a pathogen population. Recent theory predicts that evolution towards increased virulence can be reversed if less virulent social ‘cheats’ exploit virulent ‘cooperator’ pathogens. However, there is little evidence that social exploitation operates within natural pathogen populations. I will demonstrate that for the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae, major virulence polymorphisms are maintained at unexpectedly high frequencies in the host Arabidopsis thaliana. Experiments reveal that the fitness costs of decreased virulence are eliminated in mixed infections, whereas less virulent strains have a fitness advantage in non-host environments. These results suggest that niche differentiation contributes to the maintenance of virulence polymorphisms, and that both within-host and between-host pathogen growth must be considered to understand the roles of cheating and cooperation in pathogen populations.

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