Australian Museum

As a starting point in the quest to establish a microbiology exhibition at the Australian Museum JAMS has been invited to register to present a show or expo booth for Science Unleashed.
 
Science Unleashed is a fresh take on the Australian Museum’s approach to science outreach. It aims to build on over a decade of successful science programs run by the Science Communication Unit and reinvigorate and streamline previous successful programs such as the annual Science in the City, Science in the Bush and Science in the Suburbs events that have touched the lives of over 100,000 people, into a unifying concept of scientific celebration.
 
For those of you interested in participating in the production and/or presentation bring your ideas along to the next JAMS meeting (30th May). We'll meet at 5 pm to have a chat and put together some ideas for the registration form (see atatched).

Sydney may have failed to deliver some sunshine on the last day of a slightly extended summer, but this didn’t dampen the spirits of Sydney’s microbiology community who turned out in numbers for the Inaugural JAMS Anniversary half-day meeting at the Australian Museum. This special meeting celebrated the first birthday of JAMS, an ASM special interest group that aims to bring together research microbiologists, post-docs and PhD students working in non-clinical research from all institutes.

Special thanks must go to the sponsors of the meeting: POCD scientific; Becton, Dickinson and Company; Macquarie University; The University of Sydney; The University of NSW; The University of Technology, Sydney, and; The University of Western Sydney. Another special thank you must also go to Federico Lauro (UNSW) and other members of the JAMS steering committee for organising the anniversary meeting and for their continued commitment to JAMS. The steering committee would also like to thank the Australian Museum who kindly provided the venue for our regular meetings and who hosted this special event.

Despite miserable weather conditions, a sizeable crowd gathered at the Australian museum for the first JAMS meeting of 2012.

Dean Procter from the University of Sydney kicked off with our first virology talk of the year at JAMS. He introduced us to the live virus vaccine used to eradicate smallpox, Vaccinia virus. It encodes three BTB-Kelch protein orthologues in the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System, where host cell proteins are selectively degraded. This mechanism can prevent the establishment of an antiviral immune response enabling it to become a viral production factory enhancing viral spread. The identification of the substrates may indicate new mechanisms by which these viruses overcome cellular defenses to cause infection.

Event Date: 
Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - 14:30 - 21:00

You are invited to our inaugural anniversary half-day meeting at the Australian Museum, set for February 29th. Please sign-up to this event if you wish to attend or email us if need be.

Registration costs have been reduced to $35 for students and $75 for everyone else, thanks to the generous sponsorships of POCD Scientific, BD, The School of Molecular Bioscience (U. Sydney), The School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences (UNSW), The School of Medicine (UWS), The Biomolecular Frontiers Research Centre (Macquarie U.), The Environmental Microbiology Initiative (UNSW), The C3 and I3 Institutes (UTS).

There is an expanded schedule with some great speakers from out of town and a poster session for PhD students. As an incentive for students to present their work, the best poster will be awarded with the inaugural EMI Best Poster Award.

If you intend to present your work, please provide a poster title during registration.

The schedule of the meeting is as follows:

2.30 - 3.00pm Poster setup.
3.00 - 3.15pm Welcomes, introductions and acknowledgements.

Many scientific minds gathered together for a series of talks on a warm October evening at the Australian Museum.

The first presenter, Martin Ostrowski from Macquarie University continued from last month’s marine microbiology theme by presenting the genetics and ecology of Synechococcus. He demonstrated the distribution patterns of Synechococcus lineages are similar in different ocean systems with comparable environmental conditions. However, specific Synechococcus lineages show a distinct distribution pattern at a global scale. This finding may be useful to predict bacterial community structures in marine ecosystems.

A keen crowd of about 35 braved the rain to attend the September JAMS, which this month was held within the more spacious setting of the 4th floor at the Australian Museum. This month’s presentations all had a marine flavour, with the audience enjoying three entertaining talks focussed on the community dynamics and biogeochemical capabilities of marine microorganisms.

JAMS celebrated July at the Australian Museum with a diverse series of talks and food and drinks, kindly supported by ASM.

Rita Rapa (UTS) started us off describing the integron/gene cassette system in the Vibrio genus. These gene cassettes add to the adaptive potential of Vibrio and are likely to be an important driver in the evolution of Vibrio in their respective niches. Through whole cell proteomic analysis, deletions in the gene cassette array exhibit altered surface associated structures. Her future work will focus on how these deletions impact Vibrio physiology.
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