Genomics



The Centre for Systems Genomics is holding a 1-day symposium on metagenomics and microbiome research, Tuesday November 17 at Bio21. 

Interested in presenting? Register now! and complete the abstract section.

This free event will feature talks on a range of microbiome-related topics including new computational and lab methods, covering a range of application areas including the human microbiome in health and disease, environmental metagenomics, ecology, agriculture and ancient DNA.

Event Date: 
Wednesday, May 27, 2015 - 18:00 - 18:15
Institution: 
Macquarie University
Title: 

Whole Genome Engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae –An introduction to synthetic biology and the Yeast 2.0 project

Abstract: 

The prevailing ethos in the emerging field of synthetic biology is to understand biology through engineering and re-design. This approach has been directed towards the construction of novel genetic regulatory circuits, altered metabolic pathways, and even whole genomes. The ‘Yeast 2.0’ project is an international synthetic biology collaboration aimed at building a fully synthetic Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome by 2017. Although only modest changes are being made to the natural genome sequence, an inducible evolution system in being incorporated into the synthetic genome that can result in large-scale genomic rearrangements. This ‘Synthetic Chromosome recombination and Modification by LoxP Mediated Evolution’ (SCRaMbLE) system will be used to generate millions of unique genomes with varied architecture and gene content. By placing appropriate selection pressure on SCRaMbLEd populations, cells with minimal genomes or superior industrial properties can be recovered. Sequencing the genomes of these isolates will then be carried out with the goal of revealing novel ‘design principles’ for rational engineering, fulfilling the synthetic biology mandate to learn by building.

Event Date: 
Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 18:15 - 18:30
Institution: 
University of Southern Maine
Title: 

Developing MicroPIE and a Microbial Ontology

Abstract: 

The study of the evolution of microbial traits requires both phylogenetic as well as phenotypic trait information (also called phenomics). Next generation sequencing has enable high throughput (meta)genomic analyses, but collecting phenotypic information, either de novo or from published taxonomic literature, to create character matrices is still tedious and time-consuming. I am part of a team of researchers developing tools to provide faster collection of microbial phenomic information from published literature. We have created a natural language processing tool, Microbial Phenomics Information Extractor, or MicroPIE, that uses existing parsers, machine-learning tools, and a library of microbial-specific terms derived from ~1000 taxonomic descriptions from the Archaea, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, and Mollicutes. We have also developed an ontology of terms found in prokaryotic taxonomic descriptions, that is organized using a formal logical framework. This ontology will be used to assist MicroPIE in character identification and extraction, facilitate the identification of trait synonyms used in prokaryotic taxonomic descriptions, and to populate character matrices with higher-level character states. The taxon-character matrices extracted using MicroPIE can be combined with phylogenomic trees and analyzed using the Arbor software package, which is a scalable, web-services based platform for conducting phylogenetic comparative analyses to test evolutionary hypotheses. I’ll show some preliminary results from an analysis of trait evolution in cyanobacteria.

 

Event Date: 
Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 17:30 - 18:00
Institution: 
University of Melbourne
Title: 

Genomic epidemiology of antibiotic resistant bacteria

Abstract: 

Microbial populations contribute to human disease in a variety of ways, both as agents of infection and as healthy components of the microbiome. Genomic approaches can offer deep insights into this hidden microbial world, including revealing the composition of microbial communities, tracking the movement of individual organisms, and illuminating evolutionary changes. Here I will present recent work applying genomic epidemiology to investigate the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in a range of important pathogens, including typhoid, dysentery and the emerging hospital superbug Klebsiella.

Event Date: 
Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 17:00 - 17:30
Institution: 
University of Southern Maine
Title: 

Prochlorococcus: the “invisible forest” in the ocean’s Outback.

Abstract: 

The smallest, most abundant phototroph in the world, Prochlorococcus, dominates the base of the food web in the “Outback” of the world’s oceans, the nutrient-depleted ocean gyres. This unicellular, marine cyanobacterium, unknown only 30 years ago, is an oligotrophic specialist with a streamlined genome and reduced cellular requirement for the limited resources available in this environment. Based on physiological and molecular analyses of isolated strains from different oceans and depths, two broad groupings of Prochlorococcus were characterized: high- and low-light adapted “ecotypes”. Within these broad groupings are many subclades, some of which have been shown to dominate under certain temperature and light conditions. Through additional culture-based studies, my lab has been exploring nutrient physiology and other physiological characteristics that may contribute to the ecology and evolution of other Prochlorococcus subgroups. Some subgroups have the capacity to utilize nitrate, which was not the case for the initial isolates of Prochlorococcus, and others differ in their pigmentation. We have also found that Prochlorococcus regulates its uptake velocity and specific affinity for inorganic and organic phosphorus under P stress conditions. Examining the physiology, ecology and genomics of Prochlorococcus isolates and natural populations is providing insights into how these tiny photosynthesizing cells create a stable, yet invisible forest in the deserts of the world’s oceans.

Event Date: 
Wednesday, January 28, 2015 - 19:00 - 19:45
Institution: 
University of Sydney
Title: 

The use of genomics in diagnostic and public health microbiology

Abstract: 

Since 2004 technological advances have enabled us to sequence more nucleic acid and generate more data in a shorter amount of time. Decreases in cost per nucleotide sequenced, the initial price of sequencing machines and the complexity of library construction means that whole genome sequencing (WGS) is available in many research labs and an increasing number of public health microbiology labs. I will examine the use of WGS in public health microbiology, particularly the possibility of investigating organisms without culture, the interrogation of genomes where PCR may be unavailable, outbreak investigation, tracking resistance mutations and novel pathogen discovery.

Event Date: 
Wednesday, January 29, 2014 - 18:00 - 18:15
Institution: 
UC Davis
Title: 

Hi-C Metagenomics: Strain- and plasmid-level deconvolution of a synthetic metagenome by sequencing proximity ligation products

Abstract: 

Metagenomics is a valuable tool for the study of microbial communities but has been limited by the difficulty of “binning” the resulting sequences into groups corresponding to the individual species and strains that constitute the community. Moreover, there are presently no methods to track the flow of mobile DNA elements such as plasmids through communities or to determine which of these are co-localized within the same cell. We address these limitations by applying Hi-C, a technology originally designed for the study of three-dimensional genome structure in eukaryotes, to measure the cellular co-localization of DNA sequences. We leveraged Hi-C data generated from a synthetic metagenome sample to accurately cluster metagenome assembly contigs into a small number of groups that differentiated the genomes of each species. The Hi-C data also associated plasmids with the chromosomes of their host and with each other orders of magnitude more frequently than to other species. We further demonstrated that Hi-C data is highly informative for resolving strain-specific genes and nucleotide substitutions between two closely related E. coli strains, K12 DH10B and BL21 (DE3), indicating such data may be useful for high-resolution genotyping of microbial populations. Our work demonstrates that Hi-C sequencing data provide valuable information for metagenome analyses that are not currently obtainable by other methods. This application of Hi-C has the potential to provide new perspective in the study of thefine-scale population structure of microbes, how antibiotic resistance plasmids (or other genetic elements) mobilize in microbial communities, and the genetic architecture ofheterogeneous tumor clone populations.

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