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Event Date: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2015 - 18:15 - 18:30
Institution: 
UTS
Title: 

Divergence in temperature stress management between coastal and East Australian current (EAC) phytoplankton populations.

Abstract: 

In June 2015, 27 scientists took part in a 3 week ocean voyage aboard the brand new Australian research vessel, the RV Investigator. The main objective of the expedition was to study sub-mesoscale processes - billows and eddies - along the productive shelf influenced by the East Australian Current. Dr Olivier Laczka is presenting the results obtained for one of the multiple projects conducted during this voyage. Microbial communities from the EAC and a coastal site (north of Smokey Cape) were incubated along a temperature gradient (spanning 32 to 15.5 °C) to examine their capacity to deal with departures from in situ temperature (~22 °C). Intracellular stress within picoeukaryote populations was examined using a fluorescent stain targeting Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Stained samples were examined with a flow cytometer (excitation wavelength 488 nm). The goal of this study was to assess whether EAC microbial communities are more thermally tolerant than coastal microbial communities and determine whether general oxidative stress patterns could be used as a signature of water mass origins.

Event Date: 
Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - 14:30 - 21:00

You are invited to our inaugural anniversary half-day meeting at the Australian Museum, set for February 29th. Please sign-up to this event if you wish to attend or email us if need be.

Registration costs have been reduced to $35 for students and $75 for everyone else, thanks to the generous sponsorships of POCD Scientific, BD, The School of Molecular Bioscience (U. Sydney), The School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences (UNSW), The School of Medicine (UWS), The Biomolecular Frontiers Research Centre (Macquarie U.), The Environmental Microbiology Initiative (UNSW), The C3 and I3 Institutes (UTS).

There is an expanded schedule with some great speakers from out of town and a poster session for PhD students. As an incentive for students to present their work, the best poster will be awarded with the inaugural EMI Best Poster Award.

If you intend to present your work, please provide a poster title during registration.

The schedule of the meeting is as follows:

2.30 - 3.00pm Poster setup.
3.00 - 3.15pm Welcomes, introductions and acknowledgements.

Event Date: 
Wednesday, January 25, 2012 - 18:15 - 18:30
Institution: 
UNSW
Title: 

The impact of petroleum hydrocarbons on microbial diversity in a sub-Antarctic soil; a proxy for soil health

Abstract: 

Anthropogenic sources of contamination remain a legacy throughout the Antarctic Region, with the majority of contamination occurring alongside concentrated human activities at research stations. At Macquarie Island, an Australian Sub-Antarctic territory we have been investigating the impact of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in the form of Special Antarctic Blend (SAB) diesel fuel on the microbial ecology of sub-Antarctic soils. Whilst bioremediation strategies are currently underway on the Island, there is a lack of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination guidelines specific to Antarctic or sub-Antarctic regions. Additionally, there is insufficient site-specific toxicity data available for remediation end points to be established. Therefore, we have assessed the bacterial and fungal response to increasing concentrations of SAB diesel fuel through a combination of novel culturing methods, flow cytometric analysis of cell numbers and massively paralley pyrosequencing targeting the 16S and ITS genes. Results of this investigation will provide the scientific basis for understanding how much fuel is too much and how clean is clean enough?

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