Methanogenesis

Event Date: 
Wednesday, January 28, 2015 - 18:00 - 18:15
Institution: 
University of New South Wales
Title: 

Biomining and methanogenesis for resource extraction from asteroids

Abstract: 

As spacecraft fuel is a limited resource, creating a readily available source for hydrocarbon-based fuels in space will reduce launch cost and increase operating time of spacecraft. Biomethanation is viable for Earth-based operations, thus applications in space under controlled conditions have potential. This study proposes a sustainable environment for methanogens on Near-Earth Objects. Vacuum and desiccation effects, at 0.025% Earth atmospheric pressure, are conducted on three bacterial and three Archaea strains to test post-exposure viability. Cell degradation and colony size reduction was quantified for aerobic strains. Adverse effects were exhibited more so in gram-negative than gram-positive strains. Archaea showed limited to no cell degradation, providing evidence that vacuum effects, at these pressures, will have minor effects on in-situ biofuel operations. If successful, a sustainable and cost-effective method of metal extraction and producing methane based fuel reservoirs could revolutionise in-situ resource and fuel resupply of spacecraft, thus enhancing spacefaring capabilities.

Event Date: 
Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - 18:30 - 19:00
Institution: 
CSIRO Livestock Industries, St. Lucia, Australia
Title: 

Differences downunder: macropodids, methane and metagenomics.

Abstract: 

The agricultural sector accounts for a large amount of Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions, and strategies that reduce the production and (or) release of methane from ruminant livestock has resurfaced as a viable research topic. While there has been a relatively intense focus on better understanding how rumen microbiology, nutrition and (or) animal genetics might be targeted and productively altered to reduce these emissions; less attention has been directed towards the comparative study of those native Australian herbivores thought to produce small amounts of methane during feed digestion. These animals include the Australian macropodids (kangaroos and wallabies), which have evolved to retain a foregut microbiota that effectively converts plant biomass into nutrients for the host animal; and appears to do so with much less methane emitted. Our research group in Brisbane has used metagenomics approaches with a view to characterize the foregut microbiota of the Tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii). There is a reduced number of methanogenic archaea resident in the macropodid foregut compared to ruminants, but the species present appear to have some unique attributes relative to their counterparts from other environments. We have also used a combination of metagenomic data and cultivation-based methods to identify and isolate several “new” bacteria that support feed digestion and fermentation schemes consistent with a low methane emitting phenotype. The structure-function relationships inherent to these interesting gut microbiomes warrant further investigation.

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