Escherichia coli

Event Date: 
Wednesday, August 27, 2014 - 18:00 - 18:15
Institution: 
USyd
Title: 

Bowel movement: resistance plasmid transfer in the gut

Abstract: 

The treatment of endogenous infections caused by commensal Escherichia coli are often complicated by antibiotic resistance. Strains of resistant E. coli in the gastrointestinal tract serve as a reservoir of resistance determinants, and dissemination of resistance genes is often facilitated by conjugative plasmids. It is important to understand these plasmids in order to track the movement of resistance determinants between populations.
 
Three faecal E. coli isolates from a healthy adult were examined. Two of these (838-98B and -3B) were resistant to ampicillin (Ap), streptomycin (Sm) and sulphamethoxazole (Su). The other (838-50A) was susceptible. 838-50A and -3B were indistinguishable by biochemical and molecular analysis (API20E, phylogenetic group PCR, RAPD). 838-98B was a distinct strain. B/O plasmid replicons were detected in both resistant isolates using PCR-based plasmid replicon typing. A B/O replicon was not detected in the susceptible strain. This suggested that a plasmid bearing a B/O replicon might be responsible for ApSmSu resistance. Conjugation experiments with a laboratory adapted E. coli strain (UB5201) confirmed that the movement of a B/O plasmid from both 838-98B and -3B conferred ApSmSu resistance. Plasmid sequencing revealed that an identical B/O plasmid, p838B-R (94.8kb), was present in 838-98B and -3B, and carried ApSmSu resistance determinants. p838B-R was also observed to mobilise small plasmids, allowing the direction of in situ transfer to be determined.
 
The observed transfer of antibiotic resistance plasmid p838B-R between two unrelated strains in the gastrointestinal tract highlights the important role commensal bacteria play in the spread of resistance determinants. While not well documented, the association of B/O-type plasmids with antibiotic resistance is evident not only through p838B-R but also other available plasmid sequences. Further studies will allow us to determine the extent to which these plasmids influence antibiotic resistance in commensal E. coli

Event Date: 
Wednesday, January 29, 2014 - 18:00 - 18:15
Institution: 
UC Davis
Title: 

Hi-C Metagenomics: Strain- and plasmid-level deconvolution of a synthetic metagenome by sequencing proximity ligation products

Abstract: 

Metagenomics is a valuable tool for the study of microbial communities but has been limited by the difficulty of “binning” the resulting sequences into groups corresponding to the individual species and strains that constitute the community. Moreover, there are presently no methods to track the flow of mobile DNA elements such as plasmids through communities or to determine which of these are co-localized within the same cell. We address these limitations by applying Hi-C, a technology originally designed for the study of three-dimensional genome structure in eukaryotes, to measure the cellular co-localization of DNA sequences. We leveraged Hi-C data generated from a synthetic metagenome sample to accurately cluster metagenome assembly contigs into a small number of groups that differentiated the genomes of each species. The Hi-C data also associated plasmids with the chromosomes of their host and with each other orders of magnitude more frequently than to other species. We further demonstrated that Hi-C data is highly informative for resolving strain-specific genes and nucleotide substitutions between two closely related E. coli strains, K12 DH10B and BL21 (DE3), indicating such data may be useful for high-resolution genotyping of microbial populations. Our work demonstrates that Hi-C sequencing data provide valuable information for metagenome analyses that are not currently obtainable by other methods. This application of Hi-C has the potential to provide new perspective in the study of thefine-scale population structure of microbes, how antibiotic resistance plasmids (or other genetic elements) mobilize in microbial communities, and the genetic architecture ofheterogeneous tumor clone populations.

Event Date: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2013 - 18:15 - 18:30
Institution: 
Macquarie University
Title: 

Dissemination of antibiotic resistance determinants via sewage discharge from Davis Station, Antarctica

Abstract: 

Discharge of untreated or macerated sewage presents a significant risk to Antarctic marine ecosystems by introducing non-native microorganisms that potentially impact microbial communities and threaten health of Antarctic wildlife. Despite these risks, disposal of essentially untreated sewage continues in the Antarctic and sub-Antarctic. As part of an environmental impact assessment of the Davis Station, we investigated carriage of antibiotic resistance determinants in Escherichia coli isolates from marine water and sediments, marine invertebrates (Laturnula and Abatus), birds and mammals within 10 km of the Davis sewage outfall. Class 1 integrons typical of human pathogens and commensals were detected in 12% of E. coli isolates. E. coli carrying these integrons were primarily isolated from the near shore marine water column and the filter feeding mollusc Laturnula. Class 1 integrons were not detected in E. coli isolated from seal (Miroungaleonina, Leptonychotes weddellii) or penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) feces. However, isolation of E. coli from these vertebrates’ faeces was also low. Consequently, sewage disposal is introducing non-native microorganisms and associated resistance genes into the Antarctic environment. The impact of this “gene pollution” on the diversity and evolution of native Antarctic microbial communities is unknown. 

 

Event Date: 
Wednesday, April 24, 2013 - 18:00 - 18:15
Institution: 
University of Sydney
Title: 

Domesticating E. coli

Abstract: 

Adaptation of environmental bacteria to laboratory conditions can lead to modification of important traits, what we term domestication. Little is known about the rapidity and reproducibility of domestication changes, the uniformity of these changes within a species or how diverse these are in a single culture. We analysed phenotypic changes in nutrient-rich liquid media or on agar of four E. coli strains newly isolated through minimal steps from different sources. The laboratory-cultured populations showed changes in metabolism, morphotype, fitness and in phenotypes associated with the sigma factor RpoS. Domestication events and phenotypic diversity started to emerge within 2-3 days in replicate sub-cultures of the same ancestor. In some strains, increased amino acid usage and higher fitness under nutrient limitation resembled those in mutants with the GASP (Growth Advantage in Stationary Phase) phenotype. The domestication changes are not uniform across a species or even within a single domesticated population. However, some parallelism in adaptation within repeat cultures was observed. Differences in the laboratory environment also determine domestication effects, which differ between liquid and solid media or with extended stationary phase. Important lessons for the handling and storage of organisms can be based on these studies.

Event Date: 
Wednesday, March 28, 2012 - 18:00 - 18:15
Institution: 
University of Sydney
Title: 

Genetically controlled network architecture in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa constrains amino acid translocation

Abstract: 

Effective nutrient translocation in fungi is essential for nutrient cycling, mycorrhizal symbioses, virulence and substrate utilization. An interconnected mycelial network is proposed to influence resource translocation, but has not been empirically tested. By comparing amino acid translocation in Neurospora crassa colonies defective in network formation and translocation between wild type colonies of different developmental ages, we can gain insight into the influence of network formation on nutrient translocation.

Syndicate content