Quotation

JAMS REPORT
Tom Jeffries
 
January JAMS got the new year off to a good start with a solid turnout and some stimulating talks. First up was Olivier Laczka who took us in to the technical realm of biosensors. Olivier’s work has focused on developing cost-effective tools for the rapid identification of micro-organisms relevant to industry and has led to several Patents.

JAMS Meeting Report – April 2012
by Thomas Jeffries
 
There was a good turnout on ANZAC day eve for three interesting talks, pizza and free local beer.
 
Kicking off the evening was John Lee, from the University of Georgia, with his ambitiously titled talk “Bioluminescence: The First 3000 Years”.  After a historical introduction to the long running observation of bioluminescence, via the discovery in 1672 that oxygen was necessary for bacterial luminescence, John told us how it was determined that bioluminescence is an enzyme mediated chemical reaction involving “luciferase” and "luciferine". In the modern age of biochemistry it was determined that ATP is the substrate in this reaction.  Following the elucidation of the structure of firefly luciferase in 1959, modern techniques (i.e. picosecond dynamic fluorescence spectroscopy and NMR) have allowed researchers to uncover the enzymes and processes involved in bioluminescence.  One of the most important of these enzymes Green-fluorescent protein (GFP) was discovered in jellyfish by Shimomura (who evidently has a lab at his house!) and led to his Nobel prize in 2008.  Due to GFP’s widespread use in research, it is regarded as one of the most important proteins in science.
 

Report by Jeff Powell

On 12 April, the 'cowboys' at the Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment played host to the 'aliens' from the Sydney region for JAMS Goes West. The mood was both enthusiastic and informative and approximately 30 people participated. The morning consisted of five short talks by representatives of five Sydney-based institutions.

Syndicate content