Marsh Lawson Mushroom Research Unit
Cnr Maze Cr and Blackwattle Creek Rd
University of Sydney Darlington Campus
Chippendale NSW 2008
 
Prof. Mark Adams to open the new Marsh Lawson Mushroom Research Facility at University of Sydney

It is with great pleasure that I write to invite you to join us for the official launch of the new Marsh Lawson Mushroom Research Unit on Tuesday, 30th October 2012.  
 
This brand new international-class research facility, one of only a handful of such entities in the world, undertakes projects with university academics, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical producers, and conducts independent trials for suppliers to the mushroom industry. It offers a new focus for a broad spectrum of experimental work in the areas of human nutrition, biological science, medicine and agriculture. 
 

 

In September, JAMS was back into top gear, with a bigger audience, and a room with a view. Kent Lim from Macquarie University led off with a talk on his PhD work on the biocontrol agent Pseudomonas strain Pf5. As is often the case in science, things didn’t work out as expected, and Kent found that knocking out suspected pyochelin transporters led to an increase rather than a decrease in efflux of this siderophore and its metabolic precursors. Kent valiantly soldiered on, applying qRT-PCR and Biolog phenotype microarrays to untangle the problem, but unfortunately, this released even more worms from the seemingly-bottomless can provided by strain Pf5. It seems that these transporters may in fact also be regulatory proteins, explaining the unexpected pleiotropic effects of the knockouts.
 

 
 
The Summer Course at the Sydney Institute for Marine Science will provide a comprehensive training for students with an interest in marine microbes and ecology. Students with a background in any one of the following areas are encouraged to apply: marine science, ecology, microbiology and biotechnology. 
 
Students will develop an integrative view of the microbes in marine ecosystems in terms of their evolution, diversity, interactions and functional roles. 
 
 

Event Date: 
Wednesday, March 6, 2013 (All day) - Thursday, March 7, 2013 (All day)

The Molecular Microbiology Meeting for 2013 has been booked for March 6th and 7th at Waterview in Bicentenial Park, Sydney, NSW. Please put the date in your diaries.

Note that the venue has changed and we are planning a meeting over 2 days. For those travelling interstate there is accommodation nearby at the Novotel and Ibis Hotels. You can book accommodation on the registration page.

Holding the meeting over 2 days has allowed us to invite more speakers and make more space for oral presentations selected from abstracts so please plan your abstract and register for the meeting so that we can include you in the program. Closing date for oral presentations will be October 26th.

The program will include:
Professor David Livermore - Drug resistance (Keynote) University of East Anglia (UEA) and Health Protection Agency, London UK

A/Professor Leo Poon - Emerging viruses (Keynote) University of Hong Kong

Professor Tom Riley -    C.difficile (Keynote) University of Western Australia

Reference: JOB321
Location: Sydney, NSW, Australia
Employer: Professor David Waite
Application deadline: CLOSED

 
JAMS Monthly Meeting Report 29th August 2012
 
Prepared by Mike Manefield
 
Though faced with a depleted audience owing to strong attendance of JAMS members at the 14th International Symposium on Microbial Ecology in Copenhagen, Denmark, speakers Dr Oliver Morton, Ms Jazmin Oszvar and Ms Zoe-Joy Newby gave three entertaining and informative presentations with JAMS trademark diversity of subject.
 
Oliver kicked off with confessions of a clinical microbiologist in his presentation entitled ‘Beware the mulch! Adaptation to its natural habitat makes Aspergillus fumigatus a formidable human pathogen’. The presentation illustrated violent interactions between germinating Aspergillus spores and human dendritic cells including a stunning transcriptomics analysis of the response of Aspergillus fumigatus to the presence of human immature dendritic cells over time.
 

 
Prepared by Valentina Wong (UNSW PhD student)
On a cold Tuesday night, Adrian Low from University of New South Wales warmed the JAMS audience with his passion on bioremediation of organochlorine contaminated groundwater. Adrian described the discovery of Australia’s first 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA) degrading consortium, AusDCA. His work in the field demonstrated the efficacy and sustainability of using organochlorine respiring bacteria to remediate organochlorine contaminants in situ. He plans to isolate the bacterial species responsible for performing this unique task.

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